Almond

All posts tagged Almond

Stuffed Marrow Part 2: The Subtly Spiced One

Published October 17, 2015 by Storm

The second marrow I had to stuff this autumn was enormous; about 18″ long and with much of it’s diameter 6.5″, I knew I was going to need a lot of stuffing.

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I made double quantity of my cheesy, nutty stuffing but it wasn’t enough; about a third of my marrow was still unstuffed. In desperation I trawled my cupboards to see what else I could make a stuffing with, the result was more successful than I had dared to hope. The recipe should give enough stuffing mix for most store bought marrows.

Ingredients

  • 4oz/115g wholemeal breadcrumbs
  • 6oz/170g ground almonds
  • 2 chunky carrots, grated
  • 2 medium eggs, beaten
  • 1 tablespoon fresh or frozen parsley
  • 1 tablespoon fresh or frozen coriander leaf
  • 1 teaspoon fennel seeds
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander seed

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Technique

Pre-heat oven to 180°C.

Mix all the stuffing ingredients together and set aside.

Slice marrow into 1.5″ to 2″ rounds, scoop out seeds and pith.

Place marrow rounds on a lipped baking tray or in a roasting dish, stuff, bake for about 1 hour.

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Apple and pear crumble with almond and star anise

Published September 13, 2015 by Storm

I’m used to the idea of foraging for autumn berries, foraging for orchard fruits is a new one to me! A recent trip on the local canal saw my Dad and I picking pears that were overhanging the water; small, crisp and slightly tart, these were an unexpected bonus to a pleasant day out.

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When a neighbour gave me a bagful of very sweet windfall apples I felt I had the perfect combination for an autumnal crumble. I used my smallest diameter casserole dish, which is 6.5 inches, for an 8 inch casserole dish increase the quantities by 50%.

For the topping:

  • 2 ounces ground almonds
  • 2 ounces plain flour (white or wholemeal)
  • 2 ounces granulated sugar
  • 3 ounces butter (or dairy free spread suitable for baking), cut into small cubes
  • 1 tablespoon flaked almonds

For the filling

  • 3 eating apples
  • 6 small, firm pears
  • 3 tablespoons orange juice
  • 3 star anise

Preheat oven to 160ºC fan or 180ºC conventional.

Make the topping by all the ingredients except the flaked almonds together between your fingers until you achieve your preferred crumble consistency. Set aside.

Core the fruit and chop into roughly ½ inch cubes.

Toss the fruit in the orange juice in your casserole dish. 

Add the star anise, evenly spaced.

Cover the fruit with the crumble topping and sprinkle flaked almonds over the top.

Bake for approx’ 1 hour.

February Baking

Published March 11, 2015 by Storm

I’ve just finished a cross-stitch project I really want to write a bit about, but I’d best not yet as it still needs to reach its destination. Instead I’m going to try and re-ignite the baking inspiration which has gone into hibernation this month. Last month I tried plenty of new loaf recipes, this month I don’t seem to be quite organised enough.

Spelt and Bulgur Wheat Bread

From The Cook’s Encyclopedia of Bread Machine Baking, which is becoming a well thumbed volume, this used a combination of white wheat and wholemeal spelt flours with the interesting addition of bulgur. This made a tasty loaf and the bulgur gave an interesting crunch to it. It was definitely best fresh though, as it dried out quite quickly; if I make it again I’ll use the dough setting on the bread machine and bake it in the oven as rolls, which should keep a little better.

Raspberry and Almond Teabread

From the same recipe book, not a bread at all but a cake for sharing. Not too sweet but beautifully moist and very easy to eat. I should feel guilty about out of season raspberries but sometimes you just need a treat, especially if you have a friend visiting who also deserves treating. Cake is good!

The Panasonic instruction and recipe booklet which came with the bread maker provided the rest of February’ bread recipes, and a good pizza base.

Apricot and Almond Loaf

If you have this recipe and haven’t tried it you need to do so! A higher protein bread, thanks to the ground almonds, this was wonderfully filling as a breakfast loaf. Toasted with butter and honey it was a real indulgence and I wish I’d had some marmalade to try it with. It was also surprisingly good with a hard, mild goats’ cheese. This loaf may cause me to stray from my aim of baking a different loaf every time I bake this year, just writing about it I want a slice.

Honey, Sunflower and Spelt Loaf

Another very indulgent baked offering. This should have been 50/50 white and wholemeal wheat flours but I didn’t have wholemeal wheat so used wholemeal spelt instead. A delicious and versatile bread I’d be happy to eat every day.

Pizza Bread

Being vegetarian I skipped the pepperoni the recipe called for, I know I could have used a vegetarian version but I’m not really a fan of fake meat, otherwise I followed the recipe as written. What a treat! The olives I used were stuffed with sun-dried tomatoes but I’d like to try it again with a mix of those and garlic stuffed ones. Probably not a loaf I’d want daily but it was tasty and made fantastic fake pizza, like cheese on toast but with tomato purée spread between the bread and the cheese.

Now to decide what to try baking next.

The best recipe I’ve tried this year, plus a tasty side and a speedy supper

Published November 10, 2014 by Storm

Whoops! It’s been a month since I’ve written about the recipes I’m trying. I only skipped trying a new recipe one week of that month and that was my birthday week. I ate out a couple of times that week and had a delicious lunch in the café of The Ashmolean, if you’re in Oxford give it a try.

The best recipe of the year (so far)

In Vegetarian Cooking Through The Year I found myself thumbing beyond autumn and into winter, there I found this delicious Almond Roast. I’m a little shocked at realising that it is my favourite of the dishes I’ve tried so far this year; I have a love hate relationship with nut roasts, Dad makes a fantastic one (and I do have his recipe) but the mention of nut roasts always pulls up the unpleasant memory of those dry packet ones you mixed with water and cooked in the microwave, cloying, over-salted, and generally yuck. Anyway, I pushed past my initial aversion and I’m really glad I did.

This recipe combines almonds and mushrooms, two foods I can never get enough of. I did ignore the celery stick in the ingredients list, the one vegetable I strongly dislike, and I used a red onion for it’s delicate sweetness while I suspect the recipe intended white as it didn’t specify. My only pause for thought was how to halve the quantities, the method suggested making a half sized roast in a 1lb loaf tin or a full-size one in a 20cm ring tin; not that my maths is bad but how do you halve three eggs? My solution was to use two smaller eggs and not add the splash of water. Other than that minor mathematical challenge this roast was a doddle to make. I liked this so much I made it again last week and even the firmly carnivorous Railway Modeller found it palatable in place of stuffing with his roast dinner.

5 out of 5 for clear instructions and ease of making.

5 out of 5, plus a bonus point, for tastiness.

Also, something which is unheard of from me as I always complain recipes don’t go as far as they say they will, I got more portions out of this than the recipe suggests!

A speedy supper

Wanting something quick and easy to cook after a late shift, I decided to try the Mushroom Stroganoff recipe from the pages of The World Vegetarian Cookbook. Fry, or sauté if we’re being precise, some onion with some theoretical celery, then add some mushrooms and sauté a bit longer; herbs and stock follow, with some yoghurt at the last minute. The recipe reckoned on 30 minutes for preparation and cooking but I’m pretty sure I shaved it down to 15. Obviously, I skipped the celery, choosing to replace it with garlic which is a zillion times tastier!

5 out of 5 for ease of making.

4 out of 5 for tastiness.

And a tasty side

Already decided on making the Almond Roast again, which feeds me for most of a week, I decided that last week’s new recipe should be an accompaniment to it. A few dishes caught my eye but most were similar to things I make without referring to a recipe or didn’t quite lend themselves to working with both my main roast and The Railway Modeller’s pie. In the end it was a new, to me, method of cooking new potatoes which I decided to try. The Greens Cookbook gave the technique for New Potatoes and Garlic Baked in Parchment. As the oven was going to be in use anyway making maximum use of it’s capacity seemed a sensible idea. Also, roast garlic cloves are far nicer than they have any right to be and I was definitely interested to know if baked garlic cloves were as tasty.

This is a great way to cook new potatoes. I think we both enjoyed these; though the Railway Modeller declined to try his garlic cloves, giving them all to me. Garlic cooked like this is almost as good as roasted but it doesn’t quite have that fabulous texture, needing scraping out of it’s skin instead of sucking out. Jerusalem artichokes are freshly onto the shelves at work this week so I’m thinking of trying those cooked with this technique.

5 out of 5 for clear instructions and ease of cooking.

5 out of 5 for tastiness (there’s not really a lot that could go wrong with new potatoes and garlic).

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